GALLERY 1 - ASSEMBLAGES BY ROBERTA

GALLERY 2 - MORE ASSEMBLAGES BY ROBERTA

Thursday, November 2, 2017

Memory Jug Creations Continue....

Here are some photos of the in process work of the memory jugs (see my previous blog post)...


Part of the failed work...objects
slid off the side of the jug.
One of the larger ones I tried to go too fast and cover more surface than I should have...which resulted in the heavier objects I was trying to embed (with liquid nails), to slip off the surface of the jug... that was a real mess!  But fortunately, after waiting a few weeks, I was able to fill in the places that were slid off and it turned out wonderful too!

Staining the jugs, covered items with
painters tape to dry


This is my largest one,
and my favorite!

Fail!  The objects slid off..

After fixing the failed jug...

The finished jug, previously
a failed one.
  Here some links of videos of a few of the finished memory jugs... Link 1   and Link 2


The Making and Saving of Memories.... More Memory Jugs

Earlier this year, in the summer, I made my first memory jug with treasures found from my Dad's desk drawers.  I have now become a memory jug addict! 
Here are some of my creations in the past few months in various stages ... 

Some are small hand sized, some are 2+ feet tall, and one is over 3 1/2 feet tall.


See more of the finished details at the next post....












Thursday, October 19, 2017

The Tell Tale Heart - Assemblage inspired by Edgar Allan Poe

As a member of Gallery 223, in Lake Geneva, we were supporting the arts by having some of the members art displayed at the Lake Geneva Theatre for a performance by the Lake Geneva Actors Guild, An Evening With Edgar Allan Poe, on October 19th.

I had played around with some of the elements in this assemblage for the last few months, not really knowing where I was going with it, I had the shelf mushroom, that looked like a pair of lungs, found an odd shaped piece of black walnut, that looked to me like a human heart, and some deer antlers that could be ribs.  And I had just recently found a glass eye at a junk shop upnorth....
When this challenge came about, to create a piece to fit the performances, I knew these were what I wanted to use!

I made a blob of "blood to put under the assembled items, found an old box and some old wood floor boards that would become the floor that these items would be housed in.
I added a metal skeleton hand coming out of the drawer of the table this sat on, and a metronome below it, that would beat slowly, like the sound of a heart beating.... and tah dah! An assemblage was born... The Tell Tale Heart!

These verses from the short story by Poe are part of what inspired me in creating this....

“It is impossible to say how first the idea entered my brain; but once conceived, it haunted me day and night. I loved the old man. He had never wronged me. He had never given me insult. For his gold I had no desire. I think it was his eye! yes, it was this! He had the eye of a vulture.  Whenever it fell upon me, my blood ran cold; and so by degrees --very gradually --I made up my mind to take the life of the old man, and thus rid myself of the eye forever.”

“...there came to my ears a low, dull, quick sound, such as a watch makes when enveloped in cotton. I knew that sound well. It was the beating of the old man's heart…”

“If you think me mad, you will think so no longer when I describe the wise precautions I took for the concealment of the body. I dismembered the corpse, then took up planks from the flooring of the chamber & deposited all between the scantlings.”

“...at length, I found that the noise was not within my ears. ...Yet the sound increased -- It was a low, dull, quick sound --much such a sound as a watch makes when enveloped in cotton. I gasped for breath --and yet the officers heard it not. I talked more quickly --more vehemently; the noise steadily increased. Why would they not be gone? I paced the floor to and fro with heavy strides, --but the noise steadily increased. Oh God! what could I do? I foamed --I raved --I swore! I swung the chair upon which I had been sitting, and grated it upon the boards, but the noise arose over all and continually increased. It grew louder --louder --louder!”

Saturday, October 14, 2017

Featured Artist October 2017 at Fontana Public Library

Thank you to the Fontana Library for having my assemblage art featured during the month of October 2017.






Friday, September 29, 2017

"To Everything There Is A Season...."

"To everything there is a season..."... and one very long season, that changed my life in many ways, is now changing.. making sense (cents) of things could be the title to this assemblage of treasures I put together to explain this transition.

 I feel like I am in a whirlwind, spinning in what could be many different directions... yet grounded in Christ's sacrifice and love. I was pretty much a child, 30 years old, when I started as Treasurer at Christ Church, which turned into what would eventually become Parish Administrator. I grew in faith and learned so much along the way ministering with 5 different priests at Christ Church, and several supply clergy. On this journey, I know angels were watching over me, in many ways, and I was even blessed to literally hear them singing over me in joy at some of my decisions for Christ. I have so many to thank for the opportunities I have had!

So now, this season is ending officially on September 30th... I feel it is now a time to laugh, a time to dance, a time to embrace, a time to use what God has given me in a new and different way, to help others, and to share Christ's love. I look forward to it.. and am excited, and thankful for what the next season holds.

Sunday, September 24, 2017

Lapsarian II - The Fall

Full view of The Lapsarian
Eve Holding Apple
This is a second assemblage I've done depicting the story of Adam and Eve being tempted by the serpent (often depicted as a snake), and eating the fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, (often depicted as an apple tree). 
The Apple with core inside



Friday, September 22, 2017

Saint of the Woodlands

 
Setting out the objects to
put together.
Legs and shoes attached
Ready for
the arms.
Staining and working
on the back of the box
A Woodland Saint in the making.... Thanks to hubby John for his help too!
Side View
Front View
Inside waiting to go
to the Fontana Library
Art Show in October

The arms, croquet stakes
and salad tongs as hands
Husband John helping me attach the crutch legs
to the box body part.

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Penny Jars

Glued an open zipper on a jar
then mod-podged ripped tissue
paper on the outside.
 A fun assemblage for the upcoming Holiday Art Market at Gallery 223.  These penny banks would be fun jars for collecting the loose change you find in your pockets, on the street or in a phone booth, etc. 
Find a penny, pick it up, all day long you'll have good luck!

Tissue paper drying, then stained to
darken it and make it look aged.

Finished penny jars for sale.

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

The Pear Nibbler

My latest assemblage for your viewing entertainment...
THE PEAR NIBBLER
The inspiration for this piece was from an old 1893 “mug shot”, featuring a notorious, hardened criminal, 23 month old François Bertillon, who was caught nibbling all the pears from a basket.
While this may look like a girl, little boys used to have long hair and were kept in dresses while they were young back in the 1800’s. The dress part was for convenience before they were potty trained, the hair was considered youthful and baby cute.
This mug shot is adorable, but it is also remarkable as a historical artifact: it is one of those rare objects that documents a part of history while also giving us a glimpse into the life and personality of its creator, the father of young François, Alphonse Bertillon. Alphonse was a French police officer and biometrics researcher who was responsible for standardizing the modern mug shot. (Fun fact: the profile shot was included because Bertillon thought our ear shape might become a unique identifier, in the days before fingerprinting).
Capturing a lighthearted moment in his life and relationship with his son, this photograph brings Bertillon to life as a real man and a father. One can’t help but look at this photograph and imagine the exchange between naughty son and bemused father, perhaps as he worked on inventing mug shots in his workshop one afternoon.
Mug shots have become one of the most iconic, recognizable photographic forms in the 20th century; this image is special because it infuses this relic of visual culture with the personal history of its inventor.
I have embellished the story a bit, creating the WANTED/REWARD picture frame, and the nibbled pears, with teeth added, and an expression from one of the pears that reads “It wasn’t me.” There is an old 1800’s baby shoe that may have been the type that François would have worn in his attempted get away.

This mug shot is adorable, but it is also remarkable as a historical artifact: it is one of those rare objects that documents a part of history while
also giving us a glimpse into the life and personality of its creator, the father of young François, Alphonse Bertillon. Alphonse was a French police officer and biometrics researcher who was responsible for standardizing the modern mug shot. (Fun fact: the profile shot was included because Bertillon thought our ear shape might become a unique identifier, in the days before fingerprinting).
Capturing a lighthearted moment in his life and relationship with his son, this photograph brings Bertillon to life as a real man and a father. One can’t help but look at this photograph and imagine the exchange between naughty son and bemused father, perhaps as he worked on inventing mug shots in his workshop one afternoon.
Mug shots have become one of the most iconic, recognizable photographic forms in the 20th century; this image is special because it infuses this relic of visual culture with the personal history of its inventor.
I have embellished the story a bit, creating the WANTED/REWARD picture frame, and the nibbled pears, with teeth added, and an expression from one of the pears that reads “It wasn’t me.” There is an old 1800’s baby shoe that may have been the type that François would have worn in his attempted get away.